Tool | Updated January 2019

Home Prices in the 100 Largest Metro Areas

What's happened to the market where you live?

The table below shows changes in prices for existing homes (single-family houses and condos) for the 100 largest metro areas tracked by Clear Capital in 2018. We also show the change in home prices since the peak of the national market in mid-2006. Prices in more than half of the cities in 2018 met or exceeded their previous peak. The table also shows how far prices have risen since the bottom of the market in early 2012. Prices in almost one-fifth of the 100 cities have doubled since then, led by Las Vegas.

The median home price (half of all homes sold cost more, and half cost less) as of December 31 was $240,000, an increase of $8,000 in 2018, compared with an increase of $20,000 in 2017. The smaller amount reflects a slowdown in home-price growth, as well as an increase in the number of entry-level homes sold.

The affordability index shows the relative affordability of cities (on a scale of 1 to 10; 1 is most affordable and 10 is least affordable). Itís based on the percentage of annual income required to buy a median-priced home in each metro area in late 2018. The least affordable city is New York, and the most affordable is Detroit.

Home prices have outpaced wages and rents in about three-fourths of 755 counties analyzed by ATTOM Data Solutions. Renting a three-bedroom home is more affordable than buying a median-priced home in more than half of those markets and in the vast majority of the largest cities. Among cities with more than 1 million people, the only three where itís still more affordable to buy a home than rent are Cleveland, Detroit and Philadelphia (see Where Home Prices Are Headed in 2019).

To sort the columns by category, click the ▲/▼ buttons to arrange them by ascending or descending value. The default order is alphabetical.

Metro Area
Median
Home Price
% Change
in 2018
% Change
Since Peak*
% Change
Since Bottom
Affordability Index
Akron, Ohio $135,000 11.3 -9.0 51.8 3
Albany, N.Y. 182,000 8.7 5.0 18.5 8
Albuquerque, N.M. 167,000 3.2 7.6 28.8 7
Allentown, Pa. 175,000 11.8 -10.2 32.4 5
Atlanta, Ga. 210,000 8.9 5.8 106.4 4
Augusta, Ga. 155,000 5.7 6.8 25.3 1
Austin, Texas 290,000 2.2 81.1 80.0 9
Bakersfield, Calif. 215,000 6.8 -21.3 81.5 7
Baltimore, Md. 248,000 6.0 -15.8 26.7 5
Baton Rouge, La. 168,000 1.7 31.6 14.4 3
Birmingham, Ala. 153,000 5.0 -8.0 31.1 1
Boise, Idaho 260,000 15.7 26.1 121.7 8
Boston, Mass. 410,000 7.0 14.3 57.2 9
Bridgeport, Conn. 356,000 2.2 -18.6 24.7 7
Buffalo, N.Y. 141,000 9.3 55.1 46.9 5
Cape Coral, Fla. 209,000 2.3 -21.8 82.1 8
Charleston, S.C. 239,000 5.9 18.9 59.2 8
Charlotte, N.C. 204,000 7.3 29.6 57.8 4
Chattanooga, Tenn. 158,000 6.7 25.8 45.2 4
Chicago, Ill. 215,000 6.1 -18.4 62.8 4
Cincinnati, Ohio 158,000 8.4 5.3 46.3 2
Cleveland, Ohio 128,000 9.9 -18.7 56.1 1
Colorado Springs, Colo. 280,000 8.7 34.7 60.0 8
Columbia, S.C. 139,000 8.7 6.3 27.9 2
Columbus, Ohio 180,000 9.0 17.3 55.0 4
Dallas, Texas 195,000 7.1 62.5 94.2 5
Dayton, Ohio 120,000 7.4 -3.1 49.7 2
Deltona, Fla. 191,000 8.2 -13.4 95.4 7
Denver, Colo. 383,000 7.2 66.3 100.0 9
Des Moines, Iowa 173,000 3.1 16.4 37.0 3
Detroit, Mich. 157,000 12.6 -18.9 136.4 1
Durham, N.C. 220,000 5.5 32.1 38.9 3
El Paso, Texas 124,000 3.9 14.4 20.6 6
Fayetteville, Ark. 180,000 2.9 6.9 41.3 2
Fresno, Calif. 250,000 9.2 -19.6 83.1 9
Grand Rapids, Mich. 182,000 10.5 27.8 104.2 5
Greensboro, N.C. 140,000 7.9 1.9 29.5 3
Greenville, S.C. 170,000 5.5 31.7 47.2 5
Harrisburg, Pa. 163,000 4.7 3.4 16.9 3
Hartford, Conn. 209,000 1.6 -12.8 13.2 5
Honolulu, Hi. 600,000 6.2 43.3 53.5 10
Houston, Texas 178,000 4.5 37.2 77.1 4
Indianapolis, Ind. 125,000 9.7 -2.7 52.8 2
Jacksonville, Fla. 195,000 8.9 -9.3 74.4 3
Kansas City, Mo. 143,000 9.1 -0.3 66.4 3
Knoxville, Tenn. 162,000 6.8 20.5 36.9 4
Lakeland, Fla. 165,000 12.2 -9.8 82.4 6
Lancaster, Pa. 190,000 6.5 19.7 26.9 7
Las Vegas, Nev. 266,000 14.9 -20.9 137.1 8
Little Rock, Ark. 145,000 3.6 4.7 6.2 2
Los Angeles, Calif. 634,000 7.1 6.1 91.6 10
Louisville, Ky. 168,000 6.1 13.3 33.3 3
Madison, Wis. 250,000 4.7 25.5 40.7 7
Memphis, Tenn. 142,000 7.4 -7.6 49.1 1
Miami, Fla. 255,000 6.3 -17.1 103.4 8
Milwaukee, Wis. 179,000 8.9 -13.4 46.7 2
Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. 252,000 6.3 0.1 67.6 5
Modesto, CA 295,000 9.6 -20.8 136.4 9
Nashville, Tenn. 247,000 7.4 54.4 74.8 6
New Haven, Conn. 194,000 5.6 -26.0 26.1 6
New Orleans, La. 184,000 5.5 11.2 48.5 4
New York, N.Y.-N.J. 410,000 9.2 -4.0 38.1 10
North Port-Sarasota, Fla. 234,000 3.6 -16.9 79.8 8
Ogden, Utah 214,000 13.0 73.3 89.3 10
Oklahoma City, Okla. 148,000 3.5 22.2 21.0 1
Omaha, Neb. 180,000 6.3 27.2 40.2 6
Orlando, Fla. 220,000 9.1 -16.3 95.7 7
Oxnard, Calif. 589,000 7.4 -5.8 69.6 10
Palm Bay, Fla. 185,000 10.2 -10.2 104.6 5
Philadelphia, Pa. 205,000 8.0 -5.1 24.9 1
Phoenix, Ariz. 252,000 8.7 -11.0 103.7 7
Pittsburgh, Pa. 138,000 5.9 16.5 32.1 2
Portland, Ore. 370,000 6.3 39.3 86.6 9
Providence, R.I. 262,000 11.7 -14.5 69.5 6
Raleigh, N.C. 246,000 5.4 30.1 38.8 6
Richmond, Va. 226,000 5.8 6.8 42.0 8
Riverside-San Bernardino, Calif. 339,000 7.0 -14.7 100.3 10
Rochester, N.Y. 137,000 6.8 17.4 27.5 4
Sacramento, Calif. 375,000 6.8 -6.8 115.5 8
Salt Lake City, Utah 255,000 9.9 68.5 101.1 9
San Antonio, Texas 153,000 10.6 54.8 69.4 6
San Diego, Calif. 545,000 5.3 4.4 84.1 10
San Francisco, Calif. 860,000 9.3 22.4 127.4 10
San Jose, Calif. 1,100,000 13.8 48.8 130.1 10
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 100,000 13.5 -13.5 24.0 2
Seattle, Wash. 430,000 8.7 47.1 110.7 9
Spokane, Wash. 228,000 12.4 40.9 59.8 7
Springfield, Mass. 200,000 6.4 1.0 41.5 6
St. Louis, Mo. 157,000 4.9 -8.5 38.1 4
Stockton, Calif. 335,000 9.7 -19.4 135.4 10
Syracuse, N.Y. 112,000 6.2 12.6 13.9 1
Tampa, Fla. 189,000 8.9 -10.7 94.9 5
Toledo, Ohio 109,000 8.1 -14.6 52.2 1
Tucson, Ariz. 198,000 8.5 -13.5 59.5 6
Tulsa, Okla. 146,000 2.3 10.9 24.1 3
Virginia Beach, Va. 217,000 4.0 -12.4 21.1 9
Washington, D.C.-No. Va. 375,000 4.3 -13.9 37.5 9
Winston-Salem, N.C. 144,000 5.7 8.1 29.1 2
Worcester, Mass. 241,000 6.1 -9.3 54.7 7
Youngstown, Ohio 77,000 1.8 -22.8 24.5 1
Home-price data as of December 31, 2018. Cities represent metropolitan statistical areas as defined by the U.S. Census. *Since May 31, 2006, when the housing market peaked nationally. Since March 31, 2012, when the housing market hit bottom nationally. # Ranked 1 (most affordable) through 10 (least affordable).

Sources: Clear Capital ATTOM Data Solutions, U.S. Census.

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